Money match

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This article is about matches fought for monetary wagers. For the type of Versus Mode game, see Coin Battle.


A money match, sometimes referred to as a cash battle and abbreviated as MM, is a gambling event that occurs between two smashers who agree to play a match against each other whose winner will get a sum of real-world money in addition to an in-game victory. Money matches may occur as side events at tournaments (such as in a Salty Suite) but can be played anywhere with two players and a game setup; money matches have also been performed via netplay, with electronic methods of payment being used to pay the wager. Non-monetary wagers have also been previously offered in month matches, such as tablets and food; a particularly well-known money match between Fox players Leffen and Chillin at Apex 2015 had a monetary wager of $100 USD, along with the loser surrendering the "rights" to Fox's default costume.

While not a requirement, money matches often feature a "theme" between the two players, with mirror matches being particularly common; EVO 2015, for instance, featured a $100 USD money match between Bizzarro Flame and Kage, two notable Melee Ganondorf players.

Money matches typically have the same rules as tournament sets, such as stage and character counterpicks, and are usually best-of-three, best-of-five, or, in particularly high-stakes cases, first-to-five. Two-on-two money matches are not unheard of, but are considerably rarer than singles.

The largest amount for any money match ever done was $1,000 USD, shared by money matches between Tafokints and Tian in Apex 2014's Salty Suite, Leffen and Mango during bracket at Apex 2015, and Leffen and SFAT at DreamHack Winter 2015; Leffen and Westballz have also planned to have a $1,000 money match.

Generally, money matches only occur in the North American, South American, and European tournament scenes (with exceptions, such as Norway). In Japan, money matches can be considered to be non-government-condoned gambling, and thus, have questionable legality.

Notable Money Matches[edit]

External links[edit]

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