Tool-assisted superplay

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A tool-assisted speedrun/superplay (abbreviated TAS) is a video of a game that was played using tools unavailable in normal gameplay, usually with the aim to play perfectly and create an entertaining video. Typically, the game is played in an emulator and a sequence of button presses is recorded (one for each human player) that will always yield the same outcome when played back. The tools used include but are not limited to: using savestates to rewind to earlier points, advancing the game frame by frame and monitoring the game's memory.

There are a number of people within the Super Smash Bros. community known for their TAS exploits.

Contents[edit]

TAS videos frequently feature particularly extreme use of advanced techniques or exploits in order to perform matches that would ordinarily be impossible without external assistance. Common TAS videos feature players playing through matches without taking any damage, forming long, extensive, and intricate combos, and playing long, drawn-out matches involving extensive use of glancing blows and/or extreme DI, among others. Actual battles are not the only subjects of TAS videos; TAS has also been done on single-player modes such as the Home-Run Contest and Target Test games in order to achieve almost impossibly high distances or low times.

SSB64 TAS examples[edit]

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The editor who added this tag believes this page should be cleaned up for the following reason: What emulator is used? More history? 1Player records and is there an up to date list of TAS records?
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Antdgar is widely known for creating the first TAS video of Super Smash Bros., a now outdated video in which he abused Fox's shine cancels in order to flawlessly defeat two Level 9 Captain Falcons. Jpleal10 became notable for his Target Test and Board the Platforms videos. Other people within the Smash 64 community known for their TAS work are:

  • BlazeSSB
  • DsGnoll, a Japanese TAS player

Melee TAS examples[edit]

While the development of the Dolphin emulator was still in its early stages and unavailable for TAS purposes, some players made use of Melee's debug mode which features a frame-by-frame mode. Videos created in this mode came to be known as AR videos due to the mode being accessible through Action Replay. In theory, the player carefully crafts an input sequence through trial-and-error and on the final playthrough, saves a screenshot on each frame and splices them into a video afterwards. Notable examples of this are the Perfect Control series and other videos created by SuperDoodleMan, and the Break The Targets record videos created by Ajp_anton.

It should be noted that move decay is absent while in the game's debug mode which means an attack will always deal the same damage and knockback. Therefore TAS videos created in it are not accurate to what would occur on the real console.

Later on, Dolphin became available for TASing, allowing players access to more tools such as savestates. JPleal10 created the first true TAS video, playing as C.Falcon against three CPU players without taking damage. Wak, MUGG and SW-1988 (amongst others) competed in beating each other's HRC and Event Match videos, slowly beating all of the existing AR videos. An up-to-date listing of TAS records can be found here.

Another notable example includes a series of videos known as Turbo TAS created mostly by gamerfreak5665. In addition to TAS gameplay, the player uses a hack or Action Replay to allow moves to be canceled into other moves, thus allowing for even faster gameplay.

Brawl TAS examples[edit]

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The editor who added this tag believes this page should be cleaned up for the following reason: More history? 1Player records and is there an up to date list of TAS records?
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Despite Super Smash Bros. Brawl being perceived as a less technical game than its predecessor, there are plenty of TAS videos of it. A code for Gecko OS exists which allows frame-advance gameplay. However, the frame advance is manual, resulting in inconsistent progress, such as one frame being advanced slightly later than the previous. Due to Brawl not having a consistent slow-down feature like its predecessor, most TASes are done using the Dolphin emulator. versat13 is the most well known TAS Brawl player.

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